Mustafizur Rahman and Estiaque Bari

Political Economy of Change in Bangladesh

Development experiences in a number of countries bear evidence that these countries are unable to come out of the middle-income status after having graduated from the low-income group. They fall into what is often termed as the middle-income trap.

 

 

Many factors underpin such an outcome. The study at hand analyzes how Bangladesh may be able to avoid such a trap, by relying on the country’s strengths and how it could accelerate the pace of development to graduate from the middle-income status.

The publication, one among a series that analyse the political economy of development in countries in Asia, was an outcome of a country and regional initiative by Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung in Asia, exploring paths for development. Similar studies have been published by FES in India, Vietnam and Indonesia.

Rahman, Mustafizur; Bari, Estiaque

The political economy of change

escaping the middle-income trap: perspectives from Bangladesh
Dakah, 2016

Download publication (530 KB, PDF-File)

FES in Asia

This website gives you regular updates of FES regional projects and activities across our Asia country offices.

It offers news articles on current debates and a range of research publications and policy briefs to download.  

News

  • 25.06.2020 | Trade, labour and social dialogue | Event, News

    Webinar Series – Decent work for all: A post-COVID union agenda

    Event announcement: The debate over the post-COVID future is in full swing. Join us to discuss the agenda for trade unions and social justice across...

    more information

  • 19.06.2020 | Gender and social justice, #FeministAsia | News

    Dignity and recognition for care workers in Asia

    Human survival requires care work, yet paid and unpaid care work still lack recognition. An FES working group on the future of the care economy has...

    more information

  • 16.06.2020 | Trade, labour and social dialogue | News

    Call for Papers: Post-Corona Visions for the Future of Work in Asia

    Become part of our research and policy network and help us rethink the future of work in Asia during and after COVID-19. Take a look at our focus...

    more information

back to top