Peter-Tobias Stoll, Henner Gött and Patrick Abel

Model Labour Chapter for EU Trade Agreements

A draft version of the model chapter to serve as a basis for discussions with decisionmakers, policymakers and other stakeholders.

Social clauses in trade agreements aim to prevent countries from engaging in unfair competition by lowering labour standards to gain an advantage. Companies should compete on the basis of a level playing field and not by exploiting workers. Social clauses, however, are often considered to be ineffective.

With this in mind, Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung (FES) has in cooperation with Bernd Lange, Member of the European Parliament, tasked a team of researchers to put together a model labour chapter that could be used in EU trade agreements. Here we present a draft version of the model chapter to serve as a basis for discussions with decisionmakers, policymakers and other stakeholders.

This paper has been produced under the framework of the regional project Core Labour Standards Plus by FES in Asia.

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